I am no Michelangelo

Just finished this digital restoration the other day.

Obviously the original had a few issues, the biggest problem the missing arm of the subject. Then some water damage, the most visible being the stain on the ladies forehead. And a few little rips and scratches.

I was intrigued by the photo because of the blouse, I keep saying that patterned clothing in restorations will be the death of me one day ;) – they can be very tedious, but I never had stripes. I also loved the intricate stitching on the neck. I wanted to bring that detail out a bit more.

First I fixed the little rips and scratches. Then I fixed the arm. When I say ‘fixed’, really, I re-painted it digitally – awww the things you can do in Photoshop …  It took a bit of tweaking, to get the folds of the fabric right, I actually hang a shirt of my husband and arranged the arm in such a way that I could see the folds. I am no Michelangelo, he was a true genius with the folds of clothing, but I am happy how it turned out.

Then I took care of all the water stains. I then turned the image black&white, but gave it a bit of sepia, to keep the warmth. I spent a lot of time cleaning up little pixellation specks on the face, and then sharpening the eyes, the hair, the white lines on the blouse and especially the neck piece. I decided to not work much more on the background, to keep it, well, in the background.

Lastly, I gave the image a slight vignette, to darken the edges and draw the eye on the face. What do you think?

MaggieTwo

 


One Lake View

I hope this blog post finds you all well.

Just a quick one, so that you know I’m still here. Very busy at the moment, daily at the lake or the beach or in the studio. Not enough time in the day, but enjoying every second of it.

This image is a recent one going into my ‘Lake Views’ collection. Gorgeous sunset, I was running late (got held up at the kids’ soccer) and was racing down to the Reserve and started snapping as soon as I jumped out of the car. Took about 2 minutes for the red and the sun to be gone, and the day to be over.

redsunset

 


Action Plan – Two – Handling and Sorting

The last post explained how to assess the collection of old photos and documents that somehow ended up in your possession. In this post I will get into details on how to handle your old photos and documents. Most are common sense, but some might surprise you.

  • Have a clean area to work in, ideally near a large window, for light. Don’t sit in the sun and don’t turn on any artificial light. Generally avoid exposing the items to light as much as you can, so if you intend to work on them today, do it, and then tidy them up again. Don’t leave them lying around for days on end.
  • No food or drink anywhere near your working area, please.
  • Wash and dry your hands thoroughly before handling any items, and many times in-between (to be using cotton gloves is a bit of a myth it turns out, for which I am glad, because it’s really hard to sort through anything paper while wearing them: ‘Misconceptions about White Gloves‘).
  • Carefully flatten folded photos and documents. There are ways to separate them if they are sticking together. I have read about them, but I’ve never had to use them. ‘How to Flatten Folded or Rolled Paper Documents‘.
  • Hold at the edges only.
  • Remove staples, paper clips, rubber bands, sticky envelopes.
  • If you must write on your items, do so with a light pencil only, don’t press down too hard. Write legible, someone might have to pick up the work after you, don’t make their job harder because they cannot read your notes.
  • Use plastic sleeves when documents are too brittle to be handled without support. They should be enclosed but not encapsulated.
  • Never laminate papers or photographs.
  • Do not use glues or sticky tape to mend ripped items.

When sorting larger amounts of photographs, I find that initially spreading them out on our very large dinner table is the best way to go. Then I might sort them by occasion (wedding), chronologically or even by amount of deterioration eg. all undamaged photos first, then gradually getting worse.

In this initial sorting stage you could just keep everything in large acid free envelopes (cut off the sticky bit, glues and papers don’t mix). Or you could already look into where you will put everything as a long-term storage solution: acid free folders and boxes, and chemically stable plastics. This is a big subject, and I will get into this more in the next post.

I have a couple of high quality archival boxes which fit A4 sizes. With acid free cardboard separators and lots of acid free paper in-between I can easily keep photos and documents sorted, labeled, and separate from each other. It helps to have things orderly, because it will likely be impossible to do everything you want to do with them in one week. I tend to keep photographs and documents separately.

For this task not to get too tedious and frustrating, set yourself achievable goals. Finish one step at a time and don’t be afraid to walk away from it all for a couple of weeks.

Once everything is sorted to your satisfaction, and you found a way to tidy items up properly and store them safely, it’s time for the next assessment: which of them and to what degree do they need a surface clean?


Action Plan – One

So it has happened. Because of a sad family loss or other tragic circumstances beyond your control you ended up being in possession of a shoebox full of old photos and documents.

You’ve looked through them. Faces, places, stories, that may be familiar to you. And very likely, you come to realize that this is a puzzle with a lot of missing pieces. That’s what I thought when I ended up with lots of photos of my Grandmother from when she was young. I certainly recognized her, but who were the people in the photos with her? Why were they laughing? Where was this taken?

The documents you inherit may be old, fragile. The photos may be damaged, ripped, stained, moldy.

You’re thinking: “What on earth am I going to do with all this?”

First thing: Take comfort in the fact that you are not alone. It happens all the time.

This post will be the first of a few that should help you get enough advice to get an idea of what may be involved in the process of assessing and storing old photos and documents.

In my experience, there are three categories of photos and documents:

1. They have no value other than that of the personal/sentimental kind, as it would be for family history. Their damage is minor, there is no mold present. The primary focus should be on getting them digitized, photos sorted and labeled and documents transcribed. This will ensure that should they deteriorate further or get lost, you have saved them for the family. Digitizing also means that you can share them with family that might not be living close by you. Sharing files online is an awesome advantage of our digital age. Once digitized, sorted and transcribed, the originals need to be stored correctly.

2. If you suspect the photos or documents to have collector’s value, you may want to get an appraisal for them. If their value is minor, you don’t intend to handle them much but still want to keep them save, you might want to follow the steps above. If their value is substantial and the plan is to handle them frequently, I strongly suggest you consult a conservator.

3. The whole lot is moldy and smells. This is a health hazard. I hope you were wearing a particle mask and gloves while flicking through them! Keep the moldy stuff well away from anything else, before it contaminates everything in its surroundings, and please consult a professional conservator ASAP.

Understand this: Photographs will fade over time, no matter what you do. Paper will deteriorate, no matter what you do. But you can slow down the process by avoiding their exposure to light, heat, humidity and pollution.

The photo below shows some snippets from a collection of about 20 letters from WW1, that I had the great honour of digitizing recently. This involved preparation of the previously folded letters for photographing, by carefully flattening crushed edges and pressing them overnight between acid-free sheets of paper, building a suitable document stand with a large white background, photographing them by daylight, without direct sun and no flash or any other artificial lighting sources. They were in very good condition so only needed some basic digital retouching to increase contrast and enhance the faded ink. Lastly they were all saved on a USB thumb drive, for their owner to share with the family.

One hundred year old letters. It was very moving to read what young men so long ago wrote home to their families.

So if you’re tempted to just shove that shoebox back into the back of the closet: don’t. It’s someone’s history. Treat it right.

BlogLetters


The Best Job in the World

“It does not take much strength to do things, but it requires a great deal of strength to decide what to do.” Elbert Hubbard

Living the dream of turning a passion into a business sounds like the best decision in the world. But amidst the daily grind of office work & bookkeeping the passion can sometimes get buried under paperwork. Literally.

When that happens it’s high time to take a step back and remind yourself why you started on this ‘business journey’ in the first place.

I find that the best way to rekindle some of the fire within is to embark on a personal project.

For me it usually involves photos. Go figure ;)

But then of course, being a creative person, it’s never as easy as this. Because I have so many ideas that it’s actually hard to decide on just one. I confess there are quite a few projects hanging around in my head, some got started, some are still in the planning phase. Deciding on which one to do and sticking with it till the end is really hard. But every now and then I actually do finish one! Proud moment, sweet success!

This photo shows a project I did a few years back, where I scanned lots of photos of myself and my husband from the years before kids -yes, they did exist, the kids were amazed ;) – and had them printed on this 30×50″ canvas.

It hangs in the hallway and is a constant talking point. Lots of memories, lots of love. It keeps reminding me why I decided to make my passion my business and that I do have the best job in the world.

 

FamilyProjects

 


It’s about the Journey

A little while ago I wrote a post about the ‘The Perfect Sunset‘. In it I stated that I couldn’t find any foolproof information about predicting whether a sunrise or sunset is going to be one of the breathtaking ones or not. While I haven’t found any more scientific information in that regard, I have found myself a little bit more scientific background information about determining the exact spot where the sun will set (other than local knowledge and experience).

You might have learnt at school that the sun rises in the East and sets in the West, as I have. Well, it is true of course, but with quite a bit of variation. So, just a compass won’t help you much. A photo book I have in my possession recommends this Sun Compass. It is a cool little gadget, but as the explanation tells us, it is set for London, and one has to make adjustments of 5 Degrees per 500 miles. As I am pretty much on the opposite side of the world from London, this doesn’t seem very logic to me.

Some more searching found me this website which tells me (same as the local weather man on tv) the exact times for sunrise and sunset, the weather and a wealth of other information that can be quite useful when you’re thinking of going out to chase a sunset on a couple of days in the coming week.

But the best website that I found is this one which lets you type in your location and on the map you’ll see straight away the exact point of sunrise and the sunset.

Beautiful Lake Macquarie has many jetties. Jetties and sunsets go great together, always have, always will be. In my office I have a large map of the Lake. With the help of the Sun Calculator I have started to draw in the exact position of the sunsets. My iphone has a compass, so I always double check on that one when I’m out and about as well, that I am accurate. Over time I’ll have a perfect map and will know exactly which jetty I should aim for. I’ll share it with you then, promise  :)

There may well be easier and better ways of getting this map done (I have no doubt that there are some apps out by now), but I do enjoy making my dot on the map every day. After all, some things are more about the journey than the destination.

LakeMacSunset2


Photography Bucket List

Bucket lists are fun to read. If it’s other people’s bucket lists that is. While they are important for many to outline their goals or dreams or wishes in life, I find it hard to write one for myself.

Mostly I know the things I don’t want to do, either because I have done or tried them already or because they just don’t appeal to me at all. And I don’t like to write down things which come down to fate, for example celebrating 50 years of marriage. I am not normally known to be superstitious, but maybe in that regard I am a little bit.

So any list containing only things I don’t want to do could only be called an ‘Anti-Bucket List’ which sounds terrible, and I won’t write this one down.

But recently I realized that I do have a proper Bucket List when it comes to photography. Because there are a number of faces, places or things that I would love to point my camera at. It’s not a huge list, and a number of points are unlikely and even impossible to ever come true, but there you go, just for fun (one can always dream):

Photography Bucket List – in no particular order:

  • Carnival in Venice
  • Scottish Highlands
  • Times Square in New York at New Years Eve
  • Montana
  • Icebergs
  • Polar Bears
  • the Ghan
  • Oktoberfest in Munich at night, with a security detail to keep me and my tripod safe in the crowds
  • Nordic lights
  • Richard Armitage dressed up as Thorin, in my studio
  • Sean Connery from 20 years ago, in my studio
  • Kate Blanchett with the Oscar and the dress she wore that night, in my studio
  • Inside the Ferrari Factory in Italy
  • harvest time in the Champagne, France
  • the Chelsea Flower Show
  • Mount Fuji
  • tiger cubs
  • a butterfly farm
  • spending a day with a glass-blower, watching them work
  • spending a day with a wood-carver, watching them work
  • Meryl Streep as she is in ‘The Devil Wears Prada’, in my studio
  • inside a LEGO factory
  • Musee D’Orsay in Paris, without people but a crew schlepping my gear for me
  • spending a day with a bookmaker, watching them work
  • inside Versailles, with no people there
  • Grafton, Australia, when the trees are in bloom
  • The city of Kingston as portrayed in ‘Assassins Creed – The Black Flag’
  • the Oresund Bridge, which connects Denmark with Sweden
  • Venice in Winter, foggy, gloomy, Black & White
  • the inside of the original Orient Express
  • the young Grace Kelly in my studio, I still think she was the most beautiful woman that ever lived
  • Douglas Fairbanks jr, as he was in that old movie ‘Sinbad’, this was my first crush, very many years ago ;)

BucketList


Lost Opportunity

I was more a tom-boy than a girlie girl. Rather would have been an Indian or a Pirate than a Princess, rather followed tracks in the dirt and explored secret caves than playing high tea on the picnic rug with my dolls. I did have Barbies, but mine had a horse and wore pants and went on adventures rather than wearing glittery dresses and little shoes.

I could be found on the local adventure and water playgrounds, building igloos in the snow in winter and having daring toboggan rides.

I didn’t much miss the girlie playdates with endless doll-dressing and re-dressing. However, one thing I always wanted to do and never got was having ballet lessons. I remember being very jealous of friends who did, jealous of their tutus and little shoes, of all the graceful moves they learnt – I always felt clumsy and awkward next to them. I was jealous of their long hair put up in a bun. My hair never grew past shoulder length, and got progressively shorter over the years.

This little lady visiting my studio is a very girlie girl. She loves jewels and sparkly things. And she has ballet lessons. Amazing how jealousy still can sting, even after all these long years, it’s been a while since my childhood after all. And amazing how the sting still hurts but also burns with a lot of sadness and resignation over a lost opportunity.

Probably one reason why I really cherished this shoot. Let my eyes feast. Absolutely gorgeous little lady, and if polka-dots ever suit someone, they do suit her, even if it was just in a prop.

 

Olivia


Guessing the View

For a change this restoration was without any faces. This is a postcard from the early 1950s.

On its back we have neat handwriting in blue ink and the postal stamp. At some stage the postcard must have served as a coaster, because there is a clear rim of a wet glass or mug.

Not being a photo per say, but a postcard, the paper was thicker, and the print was different. That might well have saved it from total deterioration.

Nonetheless there is quite a bit of mould going on, some scratches, blue ink splotches and the usual fading and change in colour.

As it’s probably hard to see on the big Before and After image, I included some detail images. They show what I tend to find only once I zoom in, and how fiddly this work can be. Sometimes it is hard to fix something 100%, like on the lampshade in the top image. I cloned as much as I could but without a pattern to copy from somewhere I had to get somewhat artistic with it. I copied the right, undamaged side of the lampshade, and flipped it, and used that as a guide for the strongly damaged left side of the lampshade.

Same with the window detail at the very bottom. Impossible to see what is mould and what is leaves and greenery outside of the room. So I was guessing the view  :)

AuracherHofBeforeAuracherHofAfter

AuracherHofDetailsBlog


Going Market

It had been planned for some time but now finally it happened: az pictured went market.

Going to a local market or art fair is not as easy as it was many years ago when I was selling my paintings or even earlier still, when as a child I sold my toys at flea markets. So much more complicated these days, let me tell you!

First, one needs to apply. Insurance and all the paperwork and some enticing photos of your products need to be ready to be shown and, once accepted, contracts and agreements need to be signed, and rules to be obeyed and fees to be paid and things to be remembered.

And then the stall needs to be thought through, and stuff bought and printed and organized. And then all the products you intend to sell need to be bought and printed and organized.

We did a few dry runs in the back yard, to set up the marquee, tables and all (this was very important as I am so not a morning person, and to be problem solving at 6am is not my strong side!!). So when the big day came, everything went wonderfully smooth.

The organizing ladies from the 3 Peas Markets are wonderfully inviting and friendly, and the atmosphere was lovely. This cannot be underestimated. Market days are long, long days. Very few stalls can claim to be busy for 6 hours, just selling, selling, selling. There are potentially long dead times in between. Things have got to be nice, otherwise it’s just too grueling (very happy about the mozzy spray that was shared around – who would have thought there would be that much blood lust at 6am?)

All in all it went very well. I had a chat about all aspects of az pictured with a great many people who stopped by. I got to show the brag books with my works, especially the Restorations seem to be a success. I am reasonably happy with the sales. The market had strong competition with two other major events on that day, which drew a lot of customers away. I handed out what feels like a gazillion of leaflets and flyers and business cards (and kept reminding customers that Mother’s Day is in 9 weeks!!!), and as a result my website and facebook hits spiked like crazy, and inquiries and bookings have been made in the last couple of days as well. Yay.

Thanks to everyone who knows me and was able to come, it is very lovely to see a familiar face, you have no idea how much your support is appreciated  :)  And if you missed it, the next market will be Sunday April 13th.

To see more visit my website or facebook page.

GoingMarket


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