Tag Archives: creative

Not Top 10

According to the Australian Geographic, the Bernese Mountain Dog is not in the Top 10 of Australia’s Most Popular Dogs. And it’s not in the Top 10 of the Most Intelligent Breeds of Dog, according to the University of British Columbia anyway.

If you live in Australia, you may be forgiven if you’ve never even seen a real Bernese Mountain Dog, they are quite unusual down under.

However, there are few at the local dog club, and they tend to draw everyone’s attention at the Christmas party, when they are dressed up and pull a little cart, especially built for the occasion, to help Santa, tinsel and all. Quite adorable.

Even though I am from Europe and have spent considerable time in the Alps, I have not seen too many of these dogs either, but I have met Suzie, who was my model the other day for a colour splash dog silhouette. She is really only a puppy and therefore looks quite slender.

Bernese Mountain Dogs should be ‘good-natured, self-assured, placid toward strangers and docile‘, all of which Suzie is. Desirable traits for any dog regardless of breed, but even more so for a dog that can reach up to 50kg and more of weight.

If you want to read more about the Bernese Mountain Dog and its history, have a look here.

In the meanwhile enjoy Miss Suzie’s silhouette in hues of blue and purple, with red and yellow splashes xx

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Kaleidoscope Collection

Kaleidoscopes have been around since 1815 when one Sir David Brewster developed them. Already at their time they proved to be a huge success, with over two hundred thousand sold in London and Paris in just three months. Still today they are fascinating for old and young.

A proper kaleidoscope is ‘an optical instrument in which bits of glass, held loosely at the end of a rotating tube, are shown in continually changing symmetrical forms by reflection in two or more mirrors set at angles to each other. A kaleidoscope operates on the principle of multiple reflection, where several mirrors are placed at an angle to one another. Typically there are three rectangular mirrors set at 60Β° to each other so that they form an equilateral triangle, but other angles and configurations are possible. The 60Β° angle generates an infinite regular grid of duplicate images of the original, with each image having six possible angles and being a mirror image or an unreversed image.’

I have always been fascinated by kaleidoscopes, and even more so by their endless mathematical possibilities. To me, they are mind-boggling and deeply soothing, probably as well as many kaleidoscope images do reflect mandalas.

Mandalas are deeply rooted in Indian religions but forms of them can also be found in christian architecture and art. Over the last century, mandalas have made their way into western psychological interpretation, thanks to Carl Jung, the pioneer in the exploration of the unconscious through art making.

While mandala and kaleidoscope inspired images in colouring books and the painting and drawing of them is popular in both art therapy classes and for the art lover at home, this digital age has also given us a gazillion of plug-ins and photo-effect apps to turn any and every photo into a multitude of artworks.

My kaleidoscope collection is inspired by the mathematical rules on which kaleidoscopes operate. They are all created from an original photograph, taken by me, and then applying a number of layer effects in Photoshop, to create an image that could represent itself if we were looking at the original scene through a kaleidoscope. Many times, my creations seem to be having a tendency to want to be mandalas, too, and as there is no doubt in the balancing-process of the psyche when it comes to mandalas, I let them. This is a creative process, each image is worked on individually, no pre-fabricated action or filter is being applied.

My aim is to create an image that gives the colours, the look and the feel of the original photograph.

I’m hoping that they appeal to everyone who loves science and art, and has a taste for the quirky.

Small prints are available through my store, but large acrylic prints have proven to be popular. They do look stunning in large, if I may say so myself πŸ™‚

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Not Like Van Gogh

Time again to say thank you to all and everyone who goes through the troubles of following the journey of az pictured, whether it be on the blog, Facebook, Instagram or with the Lens Cap Chronicle, my very own newsletter.

This journey would only be half as much fun if I had to make it alone. I may only be a small business, but I put my heart in soul into my work. Not like Vincent Van Gogh, who said ‘I put my heart and soul into my work, and I have lost my mind in the process.’ At least I hope so πŸ˜‰

So here’s to you all and my thank you comes with a little visual treat, showing all the latest Instagram posts of mine, that have been featured on some of the collaboration fun sites that I follow.

If you want to check them out and get some creative juices flowing: @hiyapapayaphotoaday, @rainbow_wall, @tv_neatly, @shotwithlove, @seekthepositive, @365_today, @keepingwiththetimes, @its_my_week

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Melting Crayons

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Yes, it seems they are everywhere, certainly Pinterest is brimming with photos of great and successfully created Melted Crayon Art.

The madeit blog kindly did a ‘how to’, in their first of hopefully many more monthly DIY project how to’s. I had been mulling this melting crayon idea around in my head for some time, had wanted to tackle it in the school holidays, but alas ….

On an otherwise rather middle range exciting Wednesday I could have done the accounting and some cleaning and tidying but the ‘Crayation’ beckoned.

Since the kids are no more little there are no more bits of crayons in the house. I got two packs at the last grocery dash. And I already had a canvas, an oblong shape which I’ve had for ages with no real idea what to do with it. Now it time had come.

As a photographer, I like negative space, my cropping is usually such that the subject is not in the middle, but rather off center and even to the very sides of the image. It’s a thing.

And on Pinterest I spotted a few melted crayon images using negative space as well, negative space as in shapes and outlines of names etc. As the oblong shape of the canvas kind of lend itself to something longish I attempted a dolphin.

The blog also had pointed out that chasing bits of half melted crayon on kitchen bench and floor was an undesirable side-effect once the hair dryer is getting its work-out. Duly noted, which is why I decided to not break my crayons into pieces but somehow stick them on the canvas. Good old blue tac helped with that. Before that, I drew a rough outline of a dolphin with pencil on the canvas, and peeled the paper off the crayons. THAT was a really annoying and time consuming part … almost went back to accounting …. almost.

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In sections, I went around the canvas, sticking complimenting colours of crayons on and, with the hair dryer on low, started melting the crayons. Generally, it worked really well, however, eventually the crayons just melt too much – and yes, blue tac melts, too – so the angle of the hairdryer did matter a lot. Regardless, many times bits of breaking off melting crayon just flew across the canvas.

You can see the trails of these runaway pieces in the picture.

After I finished the whole outline of the dolphin, I used some crayons to put some extra drips and swirls into the paintwork. Crayons melt really quickly, and dry really quickly, too, so one has to be reasonably fast.

I took a few photos before, but got totally absorbed during the process, and quite dirty, and my camera and dirty fingers are a no no. Plus I was literally running out of time, as this dolphin took me a good 2 hours to finish …. dinner and sports drives were waiting.

Whilst I love the pools of melted colour, really cool actually, I would not recommend doing this activity with children. I burnt my fingers quite a bit and still have crayon blue under my fingernails today. And if you’re not careful and are holding the hairdryer too sideways or too low the hot wax does splatter everywhere.

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But I’m quite pleased with this attempt and the dolphin now keeps me company in the office and makes me smile while I do some bookkeeping.

 

 


Lots of Love

Lots of love in this engagement shoot.

Very gorgeous couple, and very eager to try to achieve this photo collage. I had suggested it and they had a much better plan than I did because with very little thinking time and no practice they jumped right into it and I just had to keep up snappingΒ  πŸ™‚

If I had to instruct them I think I might have gotten myself confused with all the arms and hands and right and left ….

It was great shoot, lots of laughter, and very relaxed. Loved it πŸ™‚

Love


Clean-up Art

The recent clean-up of my studio let me `find` a great many things for which I had great craft and art ideas. One thing I found was the large and sturdy shoe box of my husband’s work boots, which was filled with seashells, rocks, beach glass.

When we moved to the coast the kids were very little. And as all little (and possibly very many big) kids they LOVED collecting seashells. It was a new thing and exciting and one way to spend time at the beach, especially in the beginning when they needed to be eased into this new thing, the ocean, which was loud and wild and a bit scary at times.

As this shoe box naturally contained the best and most beautiful shells, sea glass and rock pieces and pebbles ever collected, something had to be done with them.

With the help of a plain old lattice piece from the hardware store and a lot of Liquid Nails, all these special beauties found their place on our new garden artwork.
Once the Liquid Nails were dry and our fingers cleaned from this extraordinary sticky stuff, a coat of outdoor suitable clear sealer was applied.
Now it decorates the most boring side of our garden and makes us happy every time we look at it.

Note: This post is not a call to action for depleting coastal shorelines of seashells and/or rocks. All these shells were collected in a space of about eight years, which puts it in perspective. If you intend to collect seashells from a beach, you should check with local council, as it is illegal to remove ‘anything’ from very many beaches in Australia.

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SeashellLatice


Lens Cap Chronicle

With great excitement I can announce that the first ever issue of the Lens Cap Chronicle, az pictured’s very own e-newsletter, has been a big success!

Another big hurdle taken. Who knew there’s so much to be learnt, getting an online newsletter organized? From all the technical issues to the legal ones, to setting up detailed planning for a whole year in advance to writing the articles and preparing the accompanying photos: the things a woman can do πŸ˜‰

So, if you’re interested in the latest and greatest of az pictured, special promotions and hopefully useful and interesting background information, you might want to sign up to receiving the bi-monthly publications of the Lens Cap Chronicle. Next issue will be out in April.

To sign up please contact me via my website or sign up on my facebook page.

Now that that is all done and on its way for the year, I can go back to taking photos, yay. Β  πŸ˜€

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