Tag Archives: madeit.com.au

Not Top 10

According to the Australian Geographic, the Bernese Mountain Dog is not in the Top 10 of Australia’s Most Popular Dogs. And it’s not in the Top 10 of the Most Intelligent Breeds of Dog, according to the University of British Columbia anyway.

If you live in Australia, you may be forgiven if you’ve never even seen a real Bernese Mountain Dog, they are quite unusual down under.

However, there are few at the local dog club, and they tend to draw everyone’s attention at the Christmas party, when they are dressed up and pull a little cart, especially built for the occasion, to help Santa, tinsel and all. Quite adorable.

Even though I am from Europe and have spent considerable time in the Alps, I have not seen too many of these dogs either, but I have met Suzie, who was my model the other day for a colour splash dog silhouette. She is really only a puppy and therefore looks quite slender.

Bernese Mountain Dogs should be ‘good-natured, self-assured, placid toward strangers and docile‘, all of which Suzie is. Desirable traits for any dog regardless of breed, but even more so for a dog that can reach up to 50kg and more of weight.

If you want to read more about the Bernese Mountain Dog and its history, have a look here.

In the meanwhile enjoy Miss Suzie’s silhouette in hues of blue and purple, with red and yellow splashes xx

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Kaleidoscope Collection

Kaleidoscopes have been around since 1815 when one Sir David Brewster developed them. Already at their time they proved to be a huge success, with over two hundred thousand sold in London and Paris in just three months. Still today they are fascinating for old and young.

A proper kaleidoscope is ‘an optical instrument in which bits of glass, held loosely at the end of a rotating tube, are shown in continually changing symmetrical forms by reflection in two or more mirrors set at angles to each other. A kaleidoscope operates on the principle of multiple reflection, where several mirrors are placed at an angle to one another. Typically there are three rectangular mirrors set at 60Β° to each other so that they form an equilateral triangle, but other angles and configurations are possible. The 60Β° angle generates an infinite regular grid of duplicate images of the original, with each image having six possible angles and being a mirror image or an unreversed image.’

I have always been fascinated by kaleidoscopes, and even more so by their endless mathematical possibilities. To me, they are mind-boggling and deeply soothing, probably as well as many kaleidoscope images do reflect mandalas.

Mandalas are deeply rooted in Indian religions but forms of them can also be found in christian architecture and art. Over the last century, mandalas have made their way into western psychological interpretation, thanks to Carl Jung, the pioneer in the exploration of the unconscious through art making.

While mandala and kaleidoscope inspired images in colouring books and the painting and drawing of them is popular in both art therapy classes and for the art lover at home, this digital age has also given us a gazillion of plug-ins and photo-effect apps to turn any and every photo into a multitude of artworks.

My kaleidoscope collection is inspired by the mathematical rules on which kaleidoscopes operate. They are all created from an original photograph, taken by me, and then applying a number of layer effects in Photoshop, to create an image that could represent itself if we were looking at the original scene through a kaleidoscope. Many times, my creations seem to be having a tendency to want to be mandalas, too, and as there is no doubt in the balancing-process of the psyche when it comes to mandalas, I let them. This is a creative process, each image is worked on individually, no pre-fabricated action or filter is being applied.

My aim is to create an image that gives the colours, the look and the feel of the original photograph.

I’m hoping that they appeal to everyone who loves science and art, and has a taste for the quirky.

Small prints are available through my store, but large acrylic prints have proven to be popular. They do look stunning in large, if I may say so myself πŸ™‚

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Bias All The Way

Drum roll please for a new product I’ve just added to my catalogue:

DIY Papercraft Cameras: a colouring in and papercraft activity set

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I’ve had these little camera prints for a while. They were living in the studio waiting-room, ready to entertain and keep busy any sibling or parent while I was busy taking photos next door.

They were always well liked. And then one day a Mum wanted to buy some off me, because she liked them all so much.

So I refined them to get them into a proper ‘product’ look and several test runs were done to make sure it all works perfectly fine, and voila πŸ™‚

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Mouse-made by me in Photoshop. Available in my studio or in my Made It Store.

I love them, but then I do love colouring in and papercraft anyway, and then it’s cameras, so I guess I’m bias all theΒ  wayΒ  πŸ™‚


A Beautiful, Rare Thing

It is assumed but unfortunately not happening all that often and therefore a beautiful, rare thing: small business supporting each other.

Lovely Jen from Tupsy Turvy Designs is a small business and a fellow Made it seller. She took it upon herself to interview some of us about our businesses, why we’re doing what we’re doing and our future aspirations. She not only wrote about it in her blog but also promoted extensively in her social media. A generous and lovely thing to do.

So here I’m returning the love and invite you to visit her page, read about her journey, scroll through her blog posts, maybe sign up to her newsletter, and indulge in her creations in her Made it store.

Thank you Jen xx

 


Setting the Angel free

Expanding my collection of dog silhouettes, I’ve added some marble dogs. A customer inquired whether I have any designs that are not ‘that colourful’ but rather monochrome. As I didn’t I felt it was high time to change that, especially since marble is one of those timeless classics that will never really be out of fashion when it comes to interior design. In fact, 2015 saw once more the rise of this elegant material not only as floor and wall covering but also as material for a multitude of decor items, from marble cubes to marble fruit, plant containers, clocks and even tea cups, and it is sure to be a trend to hang around for some time.

So, marble. I was doing some research, and there are about a gazillion different types of marble, which you can look up here, if you’re interested, however, for me, the only name that pops into my mind is Carrara marble. Carrara, Italy. The city Carrara is in Tuscany, a bit north of Florence, and, interestingly, it’s motto is Fortitudo mea in rota (Latin: “My strength is in the wheel”). I suppose it makes sense, considering that the wheel would have played a big role in the marble production for centuries.

I have never really owned any marble items, other than the black cube which you can see in the photos next to the marble dogs, and whilst I have been in Tuscany, I have never been to Carrara. However, I can claim some first-hand knowledge and photos, as my husband was there in 1989. Obviously, marble blocks are big, and the pictures, apart from the wiring and some machinery, remind me a lot of Asterix and Obelix comics πŸ™‚

Carrara

Clearly, it is quite a beautiful product. I’m probably reaching a bit far when I quote Michelangelo here: ‘I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free.’ If nothing else I managed to weave this quote, which long has been a favourite, into a blog post of mine πŸ™‚

As always, my marble dogs are available in my Made It store.

 


Getting Ready for Mother’s Day

Mother’s Day is just a few weeks away.

As a Mum I don’t much care about this ‘Mother of all Days to celebrate Mums’, although I confess I did drop a hint or two. With soccer season in full swing I’m usually just glad if we have time to sit together for a nice lunch or afternoon coffee.

My own Mum is far away, and any gift is long in the mail, and a double gift it is, too, as her birthday is May 7th.

As a photographer, Mother’s Day has been on my mind for months. A few very organized clients have purchased Mini-Shoot Gift Vouchers and a fair few of my photography greeting cards will be given to Mums, too.

For the first time I’ve participated in a shopping guide, and what a fine shopping guide it is. Check it out: Mother’s Day with madeit.com.au. 21 pages of fabulous items and ideas, but page 3 is my favourite, just saying πŸ™‚

And of course, being the Mum of a furbaby counts too on Mother’s Day.

MothersDay

Let’s not forget Dad’s though. I seriously feel sorry for any father who has a birthday on Mother’s Day. That’s where this little beauty comes in.

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Above acrylic blocks and the dog silhouette print are available in my store. For session gift vouchers or photography cards please contact me directly.

 

 

 

 

 


Melting Crayons

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Yes, it seems they are everywhere, certainly Pinterest is brimming with photos of great and successfully created Melted Crayon Art.

The madeit blog kindly did a ‘how to’, in their first of hopefully many more monthly DIY project how to’s. I had been mulling this melting crayon idea around in my head for some time, had wanted to tackle it in the school holidays, but alas ….

On an otherwise rather middle range exciting Wednesday I could have done the accounting and some cleaning and tidying but the ‘Crayation’ beckoned.

Since the kids are no more little there are no more bits of crayons in the house. I got two packs at the last grocery dash. And I already had a canvas, an oblong shape which I’ve had for ages with no real idea what to do with it. Now it time had come.

As a photographer, I like negative space, my cropping is usually such that the subject is not in the middle, but rather off center and even to the very sides of the image. It’s a thing.

And on Pinterest I spotted a few melted crayon images using negative space as well, negative space as in shapes and outlines of names etc. As the oblong shape of the canvas kind of lend itself to something longish I attempted a dolphin.

The blog also had pointed out that chasing bits of half melted crayon on kitchen bench and floor was an undesirable side-effect once the hair dryer is getting its work-out. Duly noted, which is why I decided to not break my crayons into pieces but somehow stick them on the canvas. Good old blue tac helped with that. Before that, I drew a rough outline of a dolphin with pencil on the canvas, and peeled the paper off the crayons. THAT was a really annoying and time consuming part … almost went back to accounting …. almost.

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In sections, I went around the canvas, sticking complimenting colours of crayons on and, with the hair dryer on low, started melting the crayons. Generally, it worked really well, however, eventually the crayons just melt too much – and yes, blue tac melts, too – so the angle of the hairdryer did matter a lot. Regardless, many times bits of breaking off melting crayon just flew across the canvas.

You can see the trails of these runaway pieces in the picture.

After I finished the whole outline of the dolphin, I used some crayons to put some extra drips and swirls into the paintwork. Crayons melt really quickly, and dry really quickly, too, so one has to be reasonably fast.

I took a few photos before, but got totally absorbed during the process, and quite dirty, and my camera and dirty fingers are a no no. Plus I was literally running out of time, as this dolphin took me a good 2 hours to finish …. dinner and sports drives were waiting.

Whilst I love the pools of melted colour, really cool actually, I would not recommend doing this activity with children. I burnt my fingers quite a bit and still have crayon blue under my fingernails today. And if you’re not careful and are holding the hairdryer too sideways or too low the hot wax does splatter everywhere.

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But I’m quite pleased with this attempt and the dolphin now keeps me company in the office and makes me smile while I do some bookkeeping.

 

 


madeit in Australia

madeit.com.au is an e-commerce site dedicated to showcase handmade items created by crafty people who physically reside in Australia. It doesn’t matter whether sellers do create for a living or as a hobby, as long as it’s their creation, it can be listed in their store on the madeit website.

As the world is big and I’m not quite ready to expose myself to it, I liked this idea and so az pictured set up a store about a year ago.

I was still doing some markets in 2015 and spending a lot of energy to get my stall stocked and a lot of time being present on said markets. Unfortunately, I think, apart from a few very successful upmarket designer-type markets, the down the road once-a-month small to middle-size market is pretty much dead, a lament repeated by countless other market stall holders I became friends with. Market insurance and market stall fees keep going up, customers continue to be happy spending money on food and anything to do with the kids, but by large, they hold their purses tight. And if they shop they expect to be able to use their credit card, pay wave, chip and what not … all of which is not that easy and uncomplicated and seldom free and mostly not feasible for small businesses.

Anyway. Since I was still focusing on markets I didn’t put too much effort into my store on madeit and – no surprise – had a bit of a slow start.

Towards the end of last year I stepped it up, and madeit itself has undergone some changes and began the new year with some well thought-through and exciting changes, with a new look newsletter, improved blog and quality presence on social media platforms. All makes sense and looks awesome and it’s so exciting to be a part of it.

And to top the excitement, January has brought me a couple of features in the shopping guides and a stint as a guest pick-editor plus a few sales … insert happy little dance emoticon.

Following madeit more closely has also exposed me to the craft and creativity of other sellers and their fabulous products. A few birthdays are already sorted πŸ™‚

If you like to support handmade in Australia, check out madeit.com.auΒ  πŸ™‚

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